From, To

dearoldlove:

Two months into our relationship you once asked me how much I loved you and I just said “From here”. You didn’t get it and you got mad and thought I was playing around.

Breaking up after almost two years together, I sent you a message 6 months later saying “To Here”.

You still didn’t get it.

minutemanworld:

Top 10 Facts About British Soldiers (by Don Hagist at the Journal of the American Revolution)
1.) They were volunteers
Unlike the Navy, the British Army did not conscript men. Men who joined were given a grace period to back out (none of this getting them drunk and signing them up when they’re liquored up). 
2.) They were career soldiers
Except for a brief time during the Revolutionary War (when a man might enlist “for the duration”), when you joined the British Army you were committing to it for your career.
3.) They enlisted as adults
Most men enlisted between the ages of 17 and 25. A few enlisted as young as 12, but these were exceptional cases—often being sons or brothers of enlisted men, or enlisting as drummers.
4.) They were generally experienced
Service time of 10+ years was not uncommon during the Revolutionary War. Of course just because a man has been in the service for a long time does not mean he’s experienced in combat. A report on the 29th Regiment of Foot in 1773 reveals the following: The average age was 33, but the age ranged from 18 to 150. The average height of the men was just under 5’8” (it wold have been shorter if not for the grenadiers). Only 1/3rd of the men & officers were English. More than 50% were Irish, 5% were Scots, and 17 were listed as “foreign” (probably from the West Indies) 
5.) They Received Pensions
One of the few careers in the 18th century with a retirement plan, though it was usually based on either 20 years of service or receiving a disability.
6.) Wives and children accompanied them.
About 20% of the men serving in North America had family with them. In most cases the women worked directly for the Army, fulfilling a variety of tasks.
7.) Lashing was actually rare 
Something like 20-30% of the men were tried in regimental courts (which were the ones which could order lashes), but only 10-15% actually received this punishment. 
8.) Literacy was actually quite high.
It’s impossible to know exactly how many men could read & write, but over half of surviving pension applications bear the signatures of the men. Many regiments established schools, or assigned men to be tutors. (This was also necessary because quite a few men couldn’t speak English.)
9.) They were not robots marching down the field
They adjusted their tactics and strategies to fit the terrain and tactics of their enemy. The win-loss record of the British Army speaks for itself. 
10.) They wore redcoats
(Except, of course, when they didn’t).
Don Hagist has written a wonderful book titled British Soldiers, American War: Voices of the American Revolution which is all about the common British soldier.
He also maintains a blog titled British Soldiers, American Revolution where he profiles individual soldiers.
The information about the 29th Regiment of Foot comes from As If an Enemy’s Country: The British Occupation of Boston and the Origins of Revolution by Richard Archer

minutemanworld:

Top 10 Facts About British Soldiers (by Don Hagist at the Journal of the American Revolution)

1.) They were volunteers

Unlike the Navy, the British Army did not conscript men. Men who joined were given a grace period to back out (none of this getting them drunk and signing them up when they’re liquored up). 

2.) They were career soldiers

Except for a brief time during the Revolutionary War (when a man might enlist “for the duration”), when you joined the British Army you were committing to it for your career.

3.) They enlisted as adults

Most men enlisted between the ages of 17 and 25. A few enlisted as young as 12, but these were exceptional cases—often being sons or brothers of enlisted men, or enlisting as drummers.

4.) They were generally experienced

Service time of 10+ years was not uncommon during the Revolutionary War. Of course just because a man has been in the service for a long time does not mean he’s experienced in combat. A report on the 29th Regiment of Foot in 1773 reveals the following: The average age was 33, but the age ranged from 18 to 150. The average height of the men was just under 5’8” (it wold have been shorter if not for the grenadiers). Only 1/3rd of the men & officers were English. More than 50% were Irish, 5% were Scots, and 17 were listed as “foreign” (probably from the West Indies) 

5.) They Received Pensions

One of the few careers in the 18th century with a retirement plan, though it was usually based on either 20 years of service or receiving a disability.

6.) Wives and children accompanied them.

About 20% of the men serving in North America had family with them. In most cases the women worked directly for the Army, fulfilling a variety of tasks.

7.) Lashing was actually rare 

Something like 20-30% of the men were tried in regimental courts (which were the ones which could order lashes), but only 10-15% actually received this punishment. 

8.) Literacy was actually quite high.

It’s impossible to know exactly how many men could read & write, but over half of surviving pension applications bear the signatures of the men. Many regiments established schools, or assigned men to be tutors. (This was also necessary because quite a few men couldn’t speak English.)

9.) They were not robots marching down the field

They adjusted their tactics and strategies to fit the terrain and tactics of their enemy. The win-loss record of the British Army speaks for itself. 

10.) They wore redcoats

(Except, of course, when they didn’t).

Don Hagist has written a wonderful book titled British Soldiers, American War: Voices of the American Revolution which is all about the common British soldier.

He also maintains a blog titled British Soldiers, American Revolution where he profiles individual soldiers.

The information about the 29th Regiment of Foot comes from As If an Enemy’s Country: The British Occupation of Boston and the Origins of Revolution by Richard Archer